About your Search

20130201
20130228
STATION
KRCB (PBS) 24
LANGUAGE
English 24
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the worst. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. the u.s. trade gap narrows as the world buys more made in america products and the u.s. buys less foreign oil. >> susie: and with gas prices rising, chevy hopes its new diesel chevy cruze will attract buyers looking for more miles per gallon. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: millions of people are bracing tonight for a powerful snow storm that could cripple the east coast. some forecasters say this could be the blizzard of the century with record amounts of snow and extremely strong winds. in parts of the northeast, transportation was shut down. the governors of massachusetts and connecticut declared a state of emergency and banned car travel, train service and cancelled flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making prarations today. erika ller repor. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars strande
council resolution. >> reporter: the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, echoed the strong criticism. >> the actions of north korea are a threat to regional peace and security, international peace and security, and they are not acceptable. they will not be tolerated. and they will be met with north korea's increasing isolation and pressure under united nations sanctions. >> reporter: the security council was quick to condemn the test. it also responded quickly in december when north korea successfully launched a long-range missile. the test could bring north korea closer to developing a nuclear warhead that is small enough to be mounted on a missile. critics point out that the security council members feel that the threat of north korea's program is becoming more rea than ever before. >> so miki, what's next? will the security council adopt tougher sanctions against north korea? >> reporter: well, the u.s., along with south korea, australia, and european members are all for tougher sanctions. these may include tightening the noose on north korea's financial institutions and weapons t
. >> reporter: despite solid earnings at the end of last year, there are fresh worries about the state of the u.s. economy and profits for this year. on top of that, financial conditions in the eurozone are still a threat to u.s. stocks. >> with the market at current levels, which... basically looks like they're priced for perfection, there doesn't leave a lot of room for any disappointing news. and there are a lot of areas that could create disappointing news. >> reporter: weissberg says many market pros believe stocks are headed higher, but they need a catalyst, and that's unlikely to come from tonight's state of the union. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: still ahead, why ailing smartphone maker blackberry is hoping the sports market will help it on its road to recovery. we'll explain in tonight's "beyond the scoreboard." a "silly sideshow--" that's what apple c.e.o. tim cook called a recent lawsuit filed by hedge fund manager david einhorn. speaking at a goldman sachs technology conference today, cook also said apple is considering einhorn's proposal to issue preferred stock and r
agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. play awesome electric company games and earn points for your favorite person, like me, hector. i mean, i'm your favorite, right? so what are you waiting for? i'm great at telling people what to do. hey kids! pick up that trash. kidding with these, right? hey! (sneezing) bless you! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. susie is off tonight. the easy talk, but difficult plans to meet the challenge of creating more middle class jobs. finance ministers and central bankers from the world's biggest economies meet to debate spending cuts versus growth. we look at international investing and pockets of strength around the globe. and, hedge fund manager carl icahn ups his stake in herbalife, calling the vitamin maker a legit business. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." investors spent much of this week focused on the u.s. market with major market indexes hitting five-year highs. but now the spotlight is shifting overseas. g-20 finance minister
over one day. another factor is there are rebels jihaddists, al-qaeda rebels that the u.s. doesn't support. i don't want to see them at the top of the heap. >> rose: that's always the answer to the question people always ask. suppose you win what then. >> it's a good question. right now they're not winning. right now you have a situation where assad is pretty entrenched and the rebels are making gammons -- games but they don't seem to be decisive yet. >> rose: able to close the deal. >> not yet. so you're looking at a fairly drawn out conflict. one of the concerns people have is if the conflict is drawn out much longer, there won't be much left to hand over to oppose the assad regime. the whole mechanism and institutions of the state will have been destroyed. >> rose: let me make sure i understand. i have your piece in front of me and i read it several times. you are reporting from people within the whitehouse they're beginning to consider as a condition deteriorates reopening that debate. is that the extent of what you're saying. >> the way i would put it is they haven't rul
>>> long road ahead. authorities in the u.s. investigate the dreamliner and find its batteries could keep it on the ground for sometime to come. u.s. transportation investigators cast doubt on a quick fix for the problems facing the dreamliner. they say regulators need to rethink their approval of batteries used in the boeing 787. a number of agencies are looking in to a string of safety incidents. deborah hershman chairs. she said a lithium ion battery sparked a fire a month ago on a japan airlines yet in boston. >> this investigation has demonstrated that a short circuit in a single cell can propagate to adjacent cells and result in smoke and fire. >> engineers packaged eight cells together in designing the battery system for the dreamliner. hersman said they did not place them far enough apart so trouble in one of them could affect the others. she said investigators have not determined why the batteries short circuited. another battery fire forced the pilot of a dreamline tore make an emergency last month in western japan. u.s. authorities grounded all 787s. officials at boe
numbers are a positive sign for the u.s. economy. investors were worried about some not so good signals today about europe's economy. stocks turned negative on comments from europe's central bank president saying the strong euro could dampen europe's recovery. here on wall street, the dow fell 42 points, the nasdaq lost three and the s&p slipped over two points. >> tom: still ahead, douglas burtnick joins us, he's with aberdeen asset management. >> susie: a battle is brewing between a big name hedge fund investor and apple. at issue: how to get apple to unlock value for shareholders. today david einhorn of greenlight capital sued apple to block a move that would stop the use of preferred shares. shareholders will vote on this at apple's annual meeting on february 27. what einhorn is proposing is that apple pay out more of its cash hoard to investors, using a special kind of preferred stock. einhorn has a lot at stake: his fund owns more than one million shares of apple, and while the stock rose a bit today, it's down 35% since its peak of $700 last september. late today apple issued thi
>>> they want to snow why another crew locked onto a helicopter. japanese and u.s. officials are urging the chinese to ensure such accidents don't happen again. a chinese navy aimed at a helicopter in mid-january. japa controls the islands. china and taiwan claim them. >> translator: it's extremely regrettable that such a unilateral provocative action has been taken. we will strongly urge the chinese to exercise restraint and not make the situation any worse. >> a spokesperson said she learned about the incident through the media. japanese government officials say the chinese are trying to give the impression they're not behind the incidents. >>> the u.s. defense secretary says it could have had grave consequences. l leon panetta says it could inflame intentions. >> they have to be part of family of nations in that region working gether. >> panetta said the united states, south korea and japan will do everything possible to ensure their territories are secu secure. he called on china to avoid antagonizing other nations. the former secretary of state said u.s. officials oppose
, but not on saturdays. the u.s. postal service is dropping saturday letter deliveries to save billions. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. fresh pain at the pump. american drivers see a steep jump in gas prices: up 15 cents a gallon in the past week alone. >> susie: and the federal reserve says it's been hit, by cyber hackers. we look at u.s. businesses and just how safe their networks are. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. postal service says this summer it will stop delivering mail on saturdays, ending a service that began 150 years ago. cutting back to a five-day a week schedule will save $2- billion. the post office has been losing about $20 million a day, as e- mail useage ramps up and mail volume plunges. congress has required the post office to deliver six days a week, but the postmaster general believes there is a loophole in the law that will allow him to make the change. darren gersh reports on the business fallout. >> reporter: first class mail is the postal service's most profitable product. it is also a business that is disappearing at the rate of 5% a year. >> people pay
explore the legal and other issues surrounding the u.s. policy. >> ifill: then, federal and state governments sue a credit ratings agency it says gave good ratings to bad mortgage investments. >> brown: ray suarez looks at president obama's use of campaign-style events to push his legislative agenda. >> ifill: hari sreenivsan examines a million-dollar match fixing scandal shaking the world of international soccer. >> brown: and playing with the enemy: we have the story of an orchestra of israelis and arabs coming together for music, and maybe more. >> the only way that we can achieve anything that is remotely related to peace is if we sit together and talk or if we at least try to. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> sailing through the heart of historic landscapes you see things differently. you get close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only the river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world and perhaps even yourself. viking
a secretive chinese military unit has hacked the computer systems of more than one hundred u.s. corporations and organizations. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we assess the damage done by the cyber attacks, and explore the motivations behind what appear to be china's systematic targeting of foreign firms and governments. >> woodruff: then, we turn to today's arguments at the supreme court over a patent case with implications for biotechnology giant monsanto, and a range of fields from medical research to computer software. >> ifill: we continue our weeklong focus on guns, "after newtown." tonight jeffrey brown reports on the possible links, if any, between violent video games and violent behavior. >> the result clearly shows that playing a violent video game increases aggressive behavior. >> one of the problems in this field is that people confuse aggression and violence. >> woodruff: and margaret warner gets an update on the oscar pistorius murder trial in south africa, as the prosecution and the defense lay out conflicting accounts o
for us. what does that mean? >> i think the good news here is that the u.s. economy is actually growing at probably about a 2% rate. so if the full sequester goes in and stays in place for the full year between now and the end of the year, then it's essentially what mr. bernanke is saying growth will be 1.5% instead of 2%. i doubt very much that's the way it's going to pan ot. entllysome kind of compromise will be worked out. but again the good news is that the u.s. consumers, u.s. businesses, are beginning to spend, are beginning to hire in the case of businesses, and that momentum seems to actually be picking up a little bit. so even in the worst case scenario we're not talking a recession. we're talking slower growth which isn't good... >> ifill: not good at a time when you're recovering. so when people look at this debate that's going on now, how do we look at it? do we look at it long-term, short term? o we look at the reality or the possibility? what is the greatest, most damaging part of this? >> well, i think the damaging part of it is, you know, this is a very, very bad way to
of the market-- including u.s. government officials who in 2007 publicly stated that problems in the subprime market appeared to be contained." >> reporter: s&p goes on to argue that the securities at issue in the justice department's case were reviewed by another ratings agen and received the same rating. s&p says it also began downgrading many mortgage securities in 2006, warning that conditions in the housing market were deteriorating. but critics say what matters is what s&p claimed at the time it stamped securities triple a. >> the ratings agencies claim that they have unique analytic abilities and very sophisticated models that enable them to determine the credit worthiness of a bond, a derivative, a security. >> rorter: s&p pointout cou rulings he diissed what it called challenges to a credit rating made with 20/20 hindsight. if the justice department does sue, standard and poor's says it will vigorously defend itself. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's word on the street: consumers, the street.com's david peltier joins us with some consumer product stoc
to another thing, action. okay. and we need to take action about the debt in the u.s. we need to change. >> we're going to pass on to our kids a less prosperous nation where they will have a lower standard of living, a massive debt they can't afford to pay off and therefore less secure nation. >> i'm to the giving up on democracy. i don't know what the alternative is. if you say a democratic government can't solve this problem, then you are saying we need a dictatorship? i dot think s. >> rose: i'm pleased to have jay fishman at this table for the first time, welcome. >> thank you, charlie s so good to be here. >> rose: so just pick up on overdraft, what's the urgency? and why hasn't the government, washington responded to something that most people agree stands in the way of america's economic growth and health? >> so let me size up the issue in just a few numbers. this discussion has been lots of words, precious few numbers. the baby boom generation of which i'm a member is moving in exorrably into that 65 and older time frame, between 2000 and 2010, 55 to 64, that population group gr
an and the future of the church, we're joined by monsignor rick hilgartner of the u.s. conference of catholic bishops. he's the executive director of the secretariat of divine worship. sister christine schenk, a catholic nun and executive director of future church, which calls for a more progressive church. and from rome, john allen of cnn. he covers the vatican for the network and for the "national catholic reporter." we thank you all three for being with us. john allen, i'm going to stay with you. how much of a surprise was this? >> judy, i think this was a near total shock. just to tell you how crazy it was, i was actually scheduled to have lunch with a senior vatican official, a guy who works just down the hall from the papal apartment. as of early this morning even he didn't know it was coming. as your set-up piece indicated the shock isn't the content of the decision -- benedict had hinted fairly openly that he was receptive to the idea of a pope resigning, that actually under some circumstances a pope would have an obligation t resign if he's not able to continue to rform his duties. b
's been very careful to say that he rejects the idea that government is evil. i mean i just saw a u.s. senator standing on the floor of the u.s. senate talking about taming the beast. and it's like, are you a u.s. senator this is not the beast. this is the federal government of the united states of america. it's a pauling for a u.s. senator to describe the government as a beast. and i think that obama has made a very determined and conscious effort to keep saying over an over again, government is not the enemy. government is an expression of, you know, the better angels of our nature. government is our way as a society of expressing ourselves in history and historical time in action. and that's-- immensely important. >> the definition of the role of government is an ongoing theme of american politics. >> yeah, so you have people like these tea party people protesting government and then asked if they really want to give up their social security payments and they don't seem to know that that is actually part of what government is. there's a rejection of the sort of basic idea of human
. >> in the u.s. we've got to be able to enable long-term thinking. we've got to give institutions that are responsible the power to bring us to the next generation as opposed to tomorrow's conflicts or, you know, the conflict in a week. we've got to take what is ideaological and paralyzes us into the debatement but once somebody has power, let them lead at least for a period of time. if afterwards they get recalled by popular world so, be it. but you want a government whoever is elected to at least lead for a while so that you can progress. in europe you've got the same issues but multiplied because not only do you have it at the nation level, you have the whole construction of europe which is sort of like an unfinished building. >> where do you come down in terms of the question that europe faces and the united states faces which is there is debt. and you have to deal to debt. and but secondly, in order to create a sustainable level of trend, you have to have growth. and too much austerity inhibits growth, certainly in the short term. >> no question. so you have got to have, well
in --. >> in the middle of the night there was a theft. in europe and possibly japan in the u.s. these animals can go for many tens of thousands of dollars. >> rose: now the plow share tortoise was once thought to be extinct? >> it was once thoug to be extinc as are the case with many species of turtles and tortoises. >> rose: then they find something that says "no, they're not all gone." >> they were rediscovered in 1971 but prior to '97 71 only a handful had reached the western world. the species e.e.g. i don't gofy had been contracted to a tiny range and a remote part of madagascar so it was unclear if there were any left. so >> so if you had unlimited resources-- and you may as far as i kw-- >> i don't, trust me. >> rose: if you had more money could you do more? >> absolutely, sure. when you choose to protect a species it's almost like going into a war. you have to choose your battles and you have to figure out -- it's a horrible thing to say but you have to figure out where can you make a measurable difference? in the case of the plow share tortoise i thought i could make a difference. i thought
that the people who put food on our tables use food stamps at twice the rate as the rest of the u.s. workforce. meaning that the people who put food on our tables can't afford to put food on their own family's tables. >> funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new yor celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and commied to doinreal and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful wor. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and
.3% in february and 0.3% in march. they estimateroduction will grow. the head of the u.s. federal reserve ben bernanke has defended the central bank's policy of monetary easing. he's aiming to eliminate speculation the bank will scale back asset buying sooner than expected. bernanke testified before house of representatives lawmakers on wednesday. >> significant majority of the committee is supportive of the policies we have taken. the it strateg yet.ew review of i think we will have to do that sometime soon. we're quite comfortable we can exit in way that's both smooth and in which we provide lots of information to markets in advance so they will know what's coming and be able to anticipate it. >> bernanke referred to monetary policy in japan saying policy had been too cautious in the past. bernanke noted that the new prime ministernd his nominee for bank of japan governor will likely push for bold monetary measures to end deflation. let's get a check on the markets. tokyo share prices are trading higher today with export related stocks leading the gains. investors are feeling positive. bett
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)